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Huge 2 Day Discount on Weekend and Week long Schools

By Jane Butel  February 8, 2022

We are offering a never before special on our February 18 - 20 weekend and our March 7 - 11 week long schools   If you register for either or both of them in full, we are discounting each 40%, making the weekend school with three  chock-full cooking sessions $630.00 instead of $1090 and the week-long class of five large lessons  $1170.00 instead of $1950.00  This offer is good on Tuesday, February 8 through Wednesday, February 9 at midnight.  All of our classes are 100% full participation in small groups so that you really learn the tips, and techniques for cooking yummy, successful dishes.

You may view the complete menus on our website, www.janebutelcooking.com, under the weekend tab or week long tab by clicking the link within either course description.

In each full participation class, I give a history of the major ingredients as well as the key recipes.  An example is that Sopaipillas were first made by the Spanish women to entice the  Pueblo Indians to come to church service. 

They were first made "on a warm, balmy April Sunday  afternoon in front of the San Francisco de Neri church in 1620.  Pretty interesting, isn't it?  They are a deep fried bread that becomes hollow when fried and is served with honey to drizzle in the hollow pocket.  When you think about it, the native Americans did not have any access to  any large amount of fat or oil for frying until the Spanish came with their hogs that yielded generous amounts of fat or lard that could be used for deep frying.  Just think about it.  What if you never had a fried doughnut or other fried bread until middle age?  They were a tremendous hit with the Native people. 

We still have a few openings for this week's "Make a Tortilla and...." class at 5 PM on Thursday February 10 and  for the "Chili It Up" class on February 24.  

Here's the recipe for Sopaipilas in a 4 cup original version and the half size recipe--

 

SOPAIPILLAS

(Deep-Fried Bread) 

Sopaipillas are truly native to New Mexico, originating in Old Town, Albuquerque, over 300 years ago.  These hollow puffs can be served as a bread and torn apart to layer with honey to accompany a spicy Tex-Mex meal.  They are delicious sprinkled with cinnamon and sugar as a dessert or snack and make wonderful “pocket bread” for stuffing with refried beans, chile con carne and sauced for a main dish sandwich. 

Leftover sopaipillas can be frozen in an airtight package for up to 3 months.  Reheat in a foil packet at 350 F for 15 minutes.  Just before serving, open the foil to allow the sopaipillas to dry out on the outside.  These puffs will be better for stuffing than for serving as a bread or dessert. 

Yield:  4 dozen 

4 cups all-purpose flour                                  

1 teaspoon baking powder

1-1/2 teaspoons salt                                        

1 Tablespoon lard or butter

1 package active dry yeast, optional              

     (gives pleasant yeasty aroma and a more elastic texture)

1/4 cup warm water (105-115 F)

1-1/4 cups scalded milk (approximately), cooled to room temperature

Cooking oil for deep frying 

  1. Combine dry ingredients and cut in shortening.           
  1. Dissolve the yeast in the warm water and add this mixture to the cooled, scalded milk, stirring well. (If not using yeast, use 1-1/2 cups milk and omit the ¼ cup water). 
  1. Add about all of the liquid to dry ingredients and work into the dough. Mix dough until it is firm and springy and holds its shape. 
  1. Knead dough thoroughly, for about 5 minutes, until smooth, firm and elastic. Invert the bowl over the kneaded dough and let rest for 10 minutes or until the dough will yield a hole when poked.  Heat a 3 to 4 inch depth of oil to 400 F in a deep fryer. 
  1. Working with one-fourth of the dough at a time, keeping the balance well covered with plastic wrap, roll to ¼-inch thickness or slightly thinner, then cut into triangles or squares; do not reroll any of the dough. Fry the sopaipillas, a few at a time, in the hot fat.  They should puff and become hollow soon after they are immersed in the oil.  If they don’t puff up, keep holding under the surface of the oil with tongs or a spoon, until they do puff.

    SOPAIPILLAS

    (Deep-Fried Bread) 2-Cup Flour Recipe or half recipe

    Sopaipillas are truly native to New Mexico, originating in Old Town, Albuquerque, over 300 years ago.  These hollow puffs can be served as a bread and torn apart to layer with honey to accompany a spicy Tex-Mex meal.  They are delicious sprinkled with cinnamon and sugar as a dessert or snack and make wonderful “pocket bread” for stuffing with refried beans, chile con carne and sauced for a main dish sandwich.

     Leftover sopaipillas can be frozen in an airtight package for up to 3 months.  Reheat in a foil packet at 350 F for 15 minutes.  Just before serving, open the foil to allow the sopaipillas to dry out on the outside.  These puffs will be better for stuffing than for serving as a bread or dessert.

     Yield:  2 dozen 

    2 cups all-purpose flour

    1/2 teaspoon baking powder

    1/2 teaspoon salt

    2 teaspoons solid vegetable shortening, lard or butter

    1-1/2 teaspoons active dry yeast (optional)

    1/4 cup warm water (110F, 45C)

    About 1/2 cup scalded milk, cooled to room temperature

    Vegetable oil for deep-frying

     

    1. Combine dry ingredients and cut in shortening.           
    1. Dissolve the yeast in the warm water and add this mixture to the cooled, scalded milk, stirring well. (If not using yeast, use 1-1/2 cups milk and omit the ¼ cup water). 
    1. Add about 1-1/4 cups liquid to dry ingredients and work into the dough. Add more liquid gradually until dough is firm and springy and holds its shape. 
    1. Knead dough thoroughly, for about 5 minutes, until smooth, firm and elastic. Invert the bowl over the kneaded dough and let rest for 10 minutes or until the dough will yield a hole when poked.  Heat a 3 to 4 inch depth of oil to 400 F in a deep fryer. 
    1. Working with one-fourth of the dough at a time, keeping the balance well covered with plastic wrap, roll to ¼-inch thickness or slightly thinner, then cut into triangles or squares; do not reroll any of the dough. Fry the sopaipillas, a few at a time, in the hot fat.  They should puff and become hollow soon after they are immersed in the oil.  If they don’t puff up, keep holding under the surface of the oil with tongs or a spoon, until they do puff.

     

 

 

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